Communication and Relationship Building for Leaders

Bucks-Mont Collaborative Leadership Training Series: Communication and Relationship Building for Leaders | October 20, 2015

Course Description:

You’ll learn Empathic Listening – If like most, your training has primarily been in writing and speaking; however, most of our days are spent listening.

-Whole Message Model – This is a template leaders can use to ensure the entirety of your message is being communicated effectively – especially those difficult messages.

Presenter William Reiner is part of the Adjunct Faculty at Holy Family University where he teaches in the Graduate School’s MBA program. His courses include leadership development, finance, and economics.


Respect rubricWe started with a Grad-school type rubric with skills/knowledge on one axis and relationships or ‘ability to connect and perceived care about me’ on the other.  Basically, people who are low in skill and poor at relationships are despised, while people who are high in skill and good at relationships are revered and respected.  Those who are good at what they do but are not trusted because they have shallow relationships are feared while those who don’t really know what they’re doing but are nice people are tolerated.

Characteristics of a Good listener:

present, not multi-tasking, not on the phone, focused on the speaker, provides ques and acknowledgements, gives TIME, sincere/genuine, restates the conversation, hears more than what is being said (empathy), is NOT formulating a response while you’re talking, patient, shows respect, not judgmental, interested, challenging when appropriate, holistic and ask probing questions

Characteristics of a Bad listener (you know, like me):

distracted, reactionary, doesn’t let you finish, impatient, no TIME, dismissive, one-up-manship, make the conversation about them, devalue what’s said, don’t seek to understand, “Efficient over effective – you may be heard but are not listened to”, not remembering the conversation (maybe we just have a bad memory, yo), jumping to conclusions, intimidating

A Bit About the Importance of Body Language:

  • 50% of the message is non-verbal
  • 10% of the message is through the words used
  • 40% is tone of voice

Listening – on a scale

-1Discounting is NEGATIVE listening

  • Providing Unsolicited Advice or trying to Solve the Problem is Discounting
  • Providing False Reassurance is Discounting – “It’ll be all right”
  • Denial of the person’s feelings is dangerous Discounting – you really can’t tell a person how they should feel. They can think differently but you feel what you feel!

0 – Silence can be positive or negative, depending on circumstance. Are you distracted or showing open body language and giving your attention?

1 – Fact Finding – get to the root of the issue with questions. Seek to clarify, look to understand so you can then be understood.

2 – Content Reflection – “It sounds like you’re saying” – provide a restatement. Restate a word or key words used by the speaker to show you’re listening.

3 – Feeling Reflection – “Sounds like you’re ___” Name or identify the EMOTION for the speaker to feel heard or validated.  Enhance with positive body language.

Empathic Listening

  • Feeling of the speaker is reflected
  • You’ve gotten to the heart of the issue.
  • The words are the tip of the iceberg, while the meaning is hidden beneath.
  • What if you identify the wrong emotion?  No worries – the speaker will CORRECT you!  Yes it’s risky and may cause anxiety, but it will get to the real issue: Emotion.
  • Emotions: disappointed, frustrated, angry, concerned, exhausted, shocked, afraid, sad, hurt, impatient, drained, deceived, worried, vulnerable, etc.
  • Ask permission before offering ideas, feedback or solutions.  “Would you like to talk through ideas?” “Sounds like you’re really frustrated, How can I help?  What do you need from me?”


  1. Listening with Empathy by John Selby
  2. Habit 5: Empathic Listening by Stephen Covey
  3. Lost Art of Listening by Michael P. Nichols

Whole Message Model

  • Delivering the hard messages and handling the difficult discussions.
  • There is often a disconnect between what’s being said and what is heard.
  • This is a Template – all of the elements of a message can be mapped out in advance.
  • Web resources I found: Performance Feedback | Whole Messages by TalentFutures | Whole Messages Communication

Observations – “I see…”  performance, behavior DIRECTLY observed

Thoughts – “I think…” we need, as a team, to follow the policy

Feelings/Emotions – “I feel…” really frustrated that, concerned, uncomfortable, anxious, etc.

Seek to Understand – ask for information – pause if needed.  What if there’s a really good reason for the behavior you observed?  This is the time to hear about it.

Wants/Needs – “I want or need…” you to come to work dressed professionally, for example.

It’s Simple, but not Easy!  Teach it to others to fully understand it.

Genuine listening is hard work; there is little about it that is mechanical… We hear with our ears, but we listen with our eyes and mind and heart and skin and guts as well – Alfred Benjamin


Many of the presentations are now posted online, so I’ve included those in the original ‘notes’ for my memory and future use.  I’ve also found a few other cool programs I didn’t get to go to, but am copying the blurb and presentation links for future use!  I did this after PLA 2012 and STILL use the “How Are Things” (HAT) and APOP (“Annual Piece of Paper”) staff evaluation method I only read about from my Post of Posts: Abolishing Performance Evaluations.

We’re trying to kick-start our teen/tween program, so there are a lot of presentations on that to share with my YS department (of two – go Glynnis and Jessica!) and some other admin-type stuff that I just find interesting.

Overall, a FANTASTIC conference. Kelly worked her butt off and it showed with a flawless experience for the participant.  I really enjoyed the opening reception at Kansas City Public (and not JUST because I got to eat Rudy’s chicken tacos again – as in twice in the one trip).  All of the presentations I went to on Thursday were extremely good, timely and I used the scenarios Vickey posed in her Transition v. Change program at my budget presentation last Tuesday (2 days after I got back from conference).  I completed my evaluation – did you? Here it is:

Overall Conference Evaluation:
Breakout Sessions Evaluation:

First one I’m sorry I missed (and not JUST because it featured Katie Hill’s Library in Coffeyville):

Library Makeover Tour around Southeast Kansas  | 2502A |  Session Materials
In May 2015, Southeast Kansas Library System sponsored a bus tour of five SEK libraries that had recently remodeled their spaces. The library communities ranged in size from under 300 to 10,000. Some had grant money and some found ways to work with their communities to achieve phenomenal changes to their buildings, use of space, and furnishings. We will show pictures of the changes, discuss the process the libraries went through, share their sources for materials and give ideas for other small libraries working with tight budgets.

Audience Focus: Kid/Teen/Adult Crossovers  | 2502B |  Presentation  |  Session Materials
Teens have always known what adults are just now learning—their books are better. This session will explore the appeal of teen literature to adults and adult literature to teens. What are adults finding so intriguing in young adult books? What are some of the trends in teen literature that adults are discovering? Which genres are crossing over the most?
-Readers’ Advisory Track

A Storywalk in the Park  | 2505A Presentation
Learn about how Scenic Regional Library used a Racing to Read grant from the Missouri State Library to put Storywalks in 7 parks, and tied them to Racing to Read literacy information.
-Programming & Outreach Track

Reading is my Superpower: Comics in the Library  | 2502B  |  Session Materials
Have you ever wondered why Batman isn’t in any of the Avengers movies? What in the world is the difference between an issue and a volume? Want to lure the cosplay crowd into your library? Join comics fangirls Lindsay and Karen for a newbie-friendly foray into the wonderful world of comics! We’ll be talking about comics history and terminology, collection development and programming. Learn how to respond to those patrons and coworkers who still feel that “comics don’t belong in the library!”

YA Literature Update 2015  | 2505B |  Presentation  |  Session Materials
What’s happening in YA Lit in 2015? What trends are popular and what genres are taking over? Learn about need to know titles to share with your teens in this popular annual session given by Youth Services Manager Sarah Bean Thompson.
-Youth Services Track

Horrible, Evil Library Books: Intellectual Freedom for New Staff  | 3501A/B Session Materials
Does your staff cringe when someone asks for 50 Shades of Grey? Does Wicca make them wince? Do they gasp in horror at splatter punk? Do they bury the the swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated? Do they blush at bosoms? How well is your staff trained to practically engage with Intellectual Freedom? Join us for an overview of how we developed a purposeful method to train new public library staff. Find out what we have done, what’s been done learned and what we will do in the future.
-User Services Track

Don’t Be Scared, It’s Just an Early Literacy Fair  | 2505A Session Materials
Have you wanted to host an early literacy fair? Curious as to what one is? We can show you how we use grant funding to make an early literacy based program that can be done on any budget. This presentation will focus on how to design a program incorporating the five early literacy skills for an audience from babies on up to readers and adults. Join our interactive session and get ideas on how to use everyday objects to create fun literacy tools that anyone can duplicate.

STEAM-y Storytimes  | 2505A  |  Presentation
Come play with STEAM! (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) At the Olathe Public Library, 2-5 year olds, and the adults who bring them, explore these concepts in creative ways through engaging activities. Come for the easy, inexpensive ideas and stay for the hands-on fun!

Format Focus: Nonfiction–Got to Be Real  | 2502B Session Materials
Narrative nonfiction is one of the fastest growing leisure reading areas in the past ten years. From micro-histories to memoirs to travelogues and history, nonfiction offers the same compelling story lines, breath-holding suspense, and colorful characters as the best fiction. Hear about some of the most popular nonfiction areas for readers, what the reader appeal is for nonfiction, and some failsafe titles for library staff and patrons.

Engaging Tweens and Teens in Our Libraries  | 2505A |  Presentation  |
We will talk about how our different systems ignite and encourage youth in middle and high school, as well as those of that age who are not currently in school, to find what they are passionate about and to then “geek out.”

STEMming Outside the Box: Passive and Self-Directed Programming for Teens and Tweens  | 2503A |  Session Materials
It is hard to talk to a children’s or teen librarian in the country who hasn’t heard of the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math(STEM) programming, but many libraries feel like they don’t have the resources, space, or expertise to put on a STEM event. We will demonstrate STEM programming ideas for teens and tweens based on the NWKLS You Try-It! Kits and the NCKLS Maker Kits. STEM, itself, covers a broad range of subjects, and the sample kits address these different areas in unique ways. This panel will provide directions and resources for creating kits and discuss ways of using kits for passive programs or for circulation. We will also discuss community organizations available for partnering in STEM programs. There will be time during the session for participants to try out materials from the kits.

KLA/MLA 2015 New Adult Fiction

New Adult Fiction: A new genre for a growing audience – with handouts – one is by author Deborah Halverson at

Presenters: Lisa Palmer – Mid-Continent book group coordinator and Beth Atwater

My Google search: “New Adult” The Next Big Thing? | Library Journal Genre Spotlight: New Adult

Age Range of the target audience: 18-30.  Perception of adulthood has changed – there’s a ‘pseudo adulthood’ period.  The books for this group cover topics of interest to this group – identity, overcoming issues, etc.

Genre read by all – the topics have broad appeal.  Anyone can be the audience, but the New Adult crowd is morphing into romance, so a predominantly female audience. The Traits: People who are making their way in the world (like on campus or starting their first job or experiencing true independence for the first time – fish out of water stories).

History of New Adult: 2009, St. Martin’s Press.  Dan Weisse editor.  No initial bookstore support, so it was slow to be adopted.  55% of YA readers are over 18 according to Bowker (Twilight/Hunger Games/etc.) – Crossover appeal.  A few self-published authors embraced this new genre and audience – and found profound success.  By 2012, publishers created own divisions.  Now it’s new, but mainstream and beginning to branch out of the romance sub-genre.

The 18 to 26 year olds had been left out of literature. – The Missing Genre Some argue it’s just YA with sex. Others argue it is unique and is about the “blisters and aches” of transitioning from teen to adult, according to Kristan Hoffman, winner of the St. Martin’s first New Adult fiction contest.

My question: How is it different than chick lit?  Was that a precursor?  Lisa mentioned Bridget Jones, and that made we wonder.

Core Collection Authors/Titles:

  • The Vincent Brothers by Abbi Glines – the ‘edited and uncut’ version a re-release  eBook often releases before the print edition.
  • Catching Liam: A good girls don’t novel by Gennifer Albin
  • This is Falling by Ginger Scott
  • Authors: Glines, Cassia Leo, Christina Lauren, Colleen Hoover, Cora Carmack, Gennifer Albin, Ginger Scott, J. Lynn/Jennifer Armentrout, and Jamie McGuire
  • Many write both YA and NA.  As with Romance, there is a Happy Ever After ending.  Tend to be contemporary romance, as well.
  • K. A. Tucker – an author for the slightly older crowd
  • More LGBT and other lifestyles portrayed in this genre.  Cora Cormack series – Friday Light Nights for New Adult with gay characters. All Lines Up first book in the series.

Review Sites:

Marketing to New Adults?

  • It markets itself – some shelve it with romance
  • Some libraries upsell and share – put it in your patron’s hands.
  • Epic GoodReads New Adult book club – idea for a library.  The digital book club brought to the library.
  • No more ‘spicy’ than a red-cover harlequin.
  • Trade size paperbacks with photographs – “young people almost kissing” covers
  • Sample titles: Wait for You, Eversea, Blue Notes
  • Many authors write under pseudonym if they write for multiple genres
  • Themes: mortality, romance,
  • How to: Writing New Adult Fiction by Deborah Halverson with forward by Sylvia Day

Beth –

Bully by Penelope Douglas – Beauty and the Beast story. Stands up to the bully next door and he falls hopelessly in love.  Transforms bad guy to good guy in just a few pages. Takes advantage of the age group to explore different themes.  Multiple book series.

Perfectly Damaged by E. L. Montes – Main character is schizophrenic.  Goes off to college and is diagnosed.  “Sad girls looking away” cover.

Frigid byJennifer Armentrout writing as J. Lynn – Stand alone, with a new sequel called Scorched.  A friends become lovers story – go out with friends in a cabin – and then it morphs into a stalker story.

#Nerd by Cambria Hebert – Tutors the football stars theme. Sells hot on Amazon and eBooks.  Print-on-demand titles. Not the best binding, but worth purchasing because of grassroots publicity.

Lisa –

Edge of Never by J. A. Redmerski – Great cover with immediate visual appeal.  Contemporary romance, just turned 21 and Cam likes to think outside the box.  Gets on a bus to see something new…and meets Andrew.  About friendship, love, living in the moment and taking time to follow your dreams. A little spicy.  Narrative is point of view.


KLA/MLA 2015 Day 3

Format Focus: Non-Fiction

Kim, Polli and Amanda are sharing all things great and good about non-fiction.  Book list to come (which is why you come to these).  I will comb through ALL of the handouts and pick out the stuff I missed and want to share.

State Librarian Luncheon (I passed – Italian sausage, ravioli in cream sauce and green beans)

Best part – a great conversation with the staff from Basehor Community Library.  I found out how they organize their Readers Theater program for 3rd-5th graders (info from Scholastic).  It’s a 3-hour workshop.  Library staff (Vicky and Patrick) pick the book, make copies of the script, read through the script, create costumes and scenery…then perform the book to friends and family.  Vicky will read the book first, so the kids are familiar with it and can talk about the story and motivation.  Patrick says the costume and scenery part is what the kids get most excited about.  Vicky will make recommendations for who gets what part based on her knowledge of her kids’ reading skills.  I think when the younger kids want to participate, I heard she may give them a part as ‘frog’ or another sound-effects-type role.  There are lots of online resources and scripts – just search ‘readers theater‘.

We also talked about an Adult Readers Theater, which might be fun, too. Think of it like recreating the good-old days of radio!  Might be great for Seniors.

I asked about passive programming and incorporating tech into story time.


LibrarySimplified – a NYC Library program – search one place for an ebook – “One discover and reading system for all ebook vendors.”  Multiple vendors is invisible and only one app is needed.  (Would be good for feeding/overdrive/oneclickdigital.)  Looks like KDL, Boston and Chattanooga are all using it.

The State Library BOUGHT Mango – so they don’t have to subscribe.  I wonder how that works?  Seems like a more cost effective options, if you can update.

KLA/MLA Day 2 – Tech Tool Trends 2015

Tech Tools Trends 2015 – Cynthia Dudenhoffer – Presentation (with all the hyperlinks)

Cynthia started by saying this was a research based talk – “there’s a lot of crap out there.”  More critical about what she shares.
Data Visualization – (dissertation topic): enable, ask, inform, see, relationships, highlight.  Present the information visually, with meaning and thoughtfulness
  • Taxonomy: London hipster coffeeshop names – won an award.  Connections of library systems example
  • Health Information: Plot medical outbreaks on a map tons end out vaccines.  Crowd source tool – get info immediately and share in a meaningful way
  • Statistics
  • Library Data Visualization Data plots for circulation by region, state circa data, play with it – great ways to work the data to share with Board and commissioners
  • Game of Thrones: Relationships decoded – very cool.  (sex one, too)
To Make:
  • – vaccine map – upload data sets
  • Google sheets/fusion tables
  • visme
To View:
  • Flowing Data has education data
  • – training offered
Convince your board of anything if you give them a pretty enough picture.
Digital Collections – Content and projects to share docs and pics
  • DPLA – app section useful to search by color, for example
  • Serendiptomatic – aggregator (like wordle but an image search that pulls images from other sources of image collections)  Metadata attached to them.
  • Kngine – new type of search engine by asking questions.  Separates content out by images, articles, answers – strips out all ads – great research starter
  • Omeka – Digital content place and make exhibits online for free (or a hosted version)
  • OpenCollections – better for libraries that have a programmer
Virtual reality
  • Google cardboard  – google explorations teams up with nasa – look and see into space.  Teen program idea.  Augmented reality affordable and educational accessible.  Libraries count for the apps.
  • Aurasma – video tutorial tool for iPhone (app) – notate a picture. Easy to use.  Library tour idea.
  • Chromville – program idea for technology with iPads – free, color, change the world with the colored pages
Education Hacks:
  • Shelfari – digital bookshelf images to highlight a collection
  • Icanhazpdf – twitter hashtag – articles will be tweeted back to you and works really well. Crowdsourced ILL.
  • ExplainEverything – white board app to notate and record voice to make tutorials (college class example)
  • DigitalPassPort – Digital citizenship tool – safe online – prepare for the internet
  • Pinterest – students use it to store citations – just use what they already use
  • SubText/AR360 – bought by accelerated reader
  • Biblionasium – gam-ifies reading for kids 7-13 year olds. Badges, etc.
  • WhatWasThere – GIS – stand in a place, and tells you the history!!!  Philadelphia!  You can add things, as well.
  • WordLens/Google Translate – virtual reality – to translate signs in real time.  JOAQUIN
  • Paper – – list sharing, gesture-based, annotate, take notes, share accounts to many people, grab images or pieces.
  • Poems by Heart – Produced by national council of English Language. to help children memorize – expose to classic literature and helps them.  PROGRAM idea. UK tool. Her 7 year old son loves it
  • ResearchReady – Craptest – web site test.  evaluates websites. Good for students.
  • Koma Koma – stop motion animator easy to use. record play back forward Cool little movies
  • Crowdflik – GIS and aggregates – concert example, find other videos of events
  • Stripdesigner – graphic novel comic book creator Templates, upload your own art
  • printShop (Makerbot) – App to draw and then print 3D
  • Lightbot – teach kids programming.  Puzzle based games (like robot turtles).  Looks like minecraft.  Teaches general functions of programming
  • MyBrushes – Painting app – options
  • Canva – Online graphic designing tool. Fun.
  • Scrapy – open source way to scrape data behind web searches. Like google analytics
  • Buffer – Organize your social media accounts – dashboard, schedule, etc.
  • SproutSocial – Proactive – use to monitor social media by topic and create an alert – trending topics to encourage you to post stuff.
  • Topsy – 2006 Twitter archive. social media search engine.
  • SocialMention – Search engine of real-time social media
  • Storify – pull social media to make a story.
  • Odyssey – GIS location based stories.  Vacation example – notate.
  • Veooz – News aggregator with social media.  Beta but good.
  • WWSGD – Seth Goden – Plug in for wordpress to remind you to thank you for commenting.  Notices for web site – bring people back to the web site
  • Trendsmap – social media and data and GIS – overlay twitter geographically in real-time.  Syria, for example. No translator built in.
Q&A – 
Mashable is where she learns about these things.  Search in Veooz for social media trends.  LifeHacker network gives ideas of new tech trends, too. Follow or get a news aggregator. Gizmodo, too, for tech side. Pocket plug-in. iPhone app to live in toolbar like pinterest.  Daily Skim – sends you links to read later.
App – Poo Log – What’s Your Poo Telling you?

KLA/MLA Day 2 – Thinking Outside the Stacks

Kathleen Morgan –, Lawrence public library Foundation director – outward facing functions of the library and Judy Keller, Jeffrey Byrne and Associates, Inc. – fundraising consultant for capital campaign and now a Board member | Presentation

Demystifying Fundraising.  Many libraries have foundations, but how do we pursue these gifts?

Lawrence Public Library’s Story: Ribbon cutting to newly renovated and expanded building after 10 years of hard work.  $19 million project with parking lot.  Library had to raise $1 million of the project, then $18 million bond.  Daunting task – a lot to raise.  Inexperienced Foundation board, with a project of this scale.  Hired a consultant and raised $1.2 million.

Most library capital campaign is $3-6 million range.  What advantages were there going into the campaign?

  • Everyone understands what a library is and does – intuitively know libraries are a good thing
  • Established leadership
  • High visibility
  • Mayor made this his/her issue and got Commission behind it
  • Library building needed it – 42 year old building and it looked it (Helped that Topeka’s library was much nicer in comparison)


  • Director resigned in early stages
  • Two lead architects left the firm in early stages of the campaign and raised questions about continuity and design
  • Highly visible and many loud opinions (on the local newspaper comment sections)  ‘chatter’


  • Other campaigns going on in town
  • Economic climate – just starting to get out of recession
  • Private v. public funding mix
  • Obsolescence – why do we even still need libraries
  • Wealthy people are shopping at Amazon
  • Foundation’s personal interest – all board and senior leadership MUST contribute


  • Friend-raising – 2 fundraisers a year (indoor golf and after-hours at the library)  Get over stodgy reputation and raise awareness
  • Feasibility Study – Closer to campaign date – “smartest thing we did” – Expensive and adds to cost.  Internal and External examination of where you are in the community and what land-mines you may encounter.  Look at donor database, mailing list, etc. and interviewed community members, Board members, leadership team, etc. Provides a pre-game plan.

New Stories – name of the campaign – Six Criteria for Success at Jeffrey Byrne

  1. A case that is valid, realist and universally accepted.  A Case For Support.  Has to make sense.  3-5 page white pages left in draft form to test with significant prospective donors.  Vetting the Case Statement – think from a donors perspective.
  2. Commitment by organizational leaders – Support and endorse with their own financial support
  3. Involvement by community leaders – Editorial staff, community leader as a champion (with credibility with donors)
  4. Strategy to obtain pacesetting gifts – $100,000 to $200,000 lead gift, plus a $75 and 2 $50’s to make up top 30% of the campaign – proper cultivation.  Must come early in the campaign
  5. Proper planning – Planning before you enter public phase is MOST critical
  6. Proper timing – What about those other campaigns?  There will always be others (hospital, school, church) – the best time is WHEN you are ready

Tips and Tricks:

  • Be Bold – “We only get to do this every 42 years”  Go for it and do what needs to be done to reach your goal.  Library touches every life int eh community
  • Be Prepared – Do the feasibility study and be ready to address any concern that pops up during the campaign.  Have the answers before the questions are asked – do your homework.  Talk to enough people
  • Know Your Community – Look, feel message must be tailored to your community
  • Get Good Volunteers – Someone respected, trustworthy, positive and very hard working.  Fun when you like each other.  Get a diverse group – draw on those networks in town.  Steering committee should be broad
  • Follow the Process – There’s an order – channel Julia Child – start from the inside and work out.  Inner family first (Board, staff should give and participate first), and then to major donors and then foundations and businesses and go public for the last 30%.
  • Be Patient – it takes time and you should expect lulls.  Don’t skip a step.
  • Ask for a specific amount – Naming opportunities as the center piece to start conversation.
  • Don’t under ask – It can offend donors
  • Be Enthusiastic – the Donor can tell if you’re faking it.
  • Celebrate Accomplishments – weekly appreciation and thanks.  Parties for landmarks – Food, Beer and Wine
  • Be Grateful – Stack of Stories to track progress.  Stack of books, reminded visitors of what was going on, brought it out after first 70% was earned.
  • Can’t be Grateful Enough – Donor wall has “Citizens of Lawrence” as the biggest donor (bond issue)


  • Set up for future success – Humanities grant on heels of successful capital campaign.  Raised another $1 mil for program endowment.  Matching grant – National Endowment for the Humanities.  Opens up other opportunities – faith, legitimacy and proven track record.
  • New Landmark Library


  • New campaign – different donors, different focus, but still had naming opportunities but some same strategies and the matching piece was appealing to donors
  • Was the campaign cost rolled in?  Yes – 10% admin expenses and lead gift was 10%.  Ended up using 8.5%.
  • Still doing events?  One a year and alternate them – caddy stacks and then the adult party.  More manageable for staff and board.
  • After hours party – last one was ‘sneak a peak’ party.  Permits, fire marshals, stress!  Thursday 5-7 pm or a Saturday night at 7 after the library closes at 6.  Fun to drink in the library after dark – magical party space.
  • Adult supervision:  Tax credit opportunities for the donors (in KS and MO) and post-campaign fundraising you can grow the endowment and support perpetual sustainability.  Planned giving with an endowment campaign (state of the art).

KLA/MLA Day 2 – Managing Transitions

It’s Not Change That’s the Problem, Its the Lack of Transition That’s the Problem with Vicky Baker, Mid-Continent Public Library | Presentation

Book: Managing Transitions by ??

Change v. Transition
Change is situational – move, new director
Transition is psychological – let go, go through the neutral zone and then make a new beginning
“Just because everything has changed, don’t think anything is different.”
Celebrate the new beginning and give time people to unplug from the old way.
Move towards acceptance of what is happening.
Letting Go:
The process causes feelings of: Fear, denial, anger, sadness, disorientation, frustration, uncertainty, sense of loss
Yes, these are also the stages of grieving.  Even happy changes are difficult transitions – everything is ‘so completely different’ for example, when you have a baby.
Go through this stage completely – if you escape too early, you’ll lose creativity and problem solving.
Case Study:  5-10 years in the future, no more print materials (we used this scenario to discuss all three stages).
Who is losing what?
Security,memories, staff lose work, everyone loses something, donors/supporters,
What exactly are they losing?
Newspapers, 24/7 access to materials even without power, losing the vehicle for stories and information, losing activities like lap-sit reading between kids and parents, poorest lose access to books because they can’t afford the devices, access v. ownership issues
How do you talk about the change?
Push acceptance and present as positive, just losing how you access the stories and information, business access, customize reading experience
Is everyone losing something?
Yes – unless you don’t read.Transfer importance of books to the new thing.  No more weeding!
How Can You Help?
  • Give as much detail and possible – who, what, when, where, how.
  • Give people information when you have the information and get it out
  • Listen sympathetically  the whiner may wear you out you have to try and understand
  • Accept the signs of grieving
  • Define what’s over and what is NOT over.  Find the positives.
  • Mark the Endings – celebrate or have a funeral
  • Let people take a piece of the old way with them (include patrons).
  • Treat the past with respect – honor where we came from
Neutral Zone – waiting for the new thing to come and you’re  one grieving
  • Anxiety rises and motivation falls
  • Absenteeism increases
  • Old weaknesses reappear
  • People are overloaded because they don’t know what they are doing
  • Systems are in flux
  • Consensus breaks down – don’t know what we are doing
  • Teamwork is undermined
  • Loyalty to the organization is lessened (during that time period)  Why?!
  • People will be frightened because they just don’t know what to expect.  Free Library example when the budgets were cut
Case Study in Neutral Zone – work is backing up and bad habits returned:
How do we motivate?
Prioritize with the person and let them start with what they enjoy, be flexible with job duties, Buy in.  Volunteers – provide help.
Absenteeism – how do you make work fun?
Small goals and then celebrate.  More days off?  Let them go.  Remind them of the importance of what they do. Give more autonomy – flexible schedule during the transition, work with them as the manager, What do we let go – identify.  Create talking points and lead from the front, Appreciate the staff that does show up (chocolate/lunch)
This too shall pass, growing pains, Celebrate all victories and improvements, Talk about it and confront the issues.
How can you help?
  • Give people a metaphor to hang on to
  • Protect people from any other changes while int he neutral zone. Delay more change.
  • Review policies and procedures
  • Create task forces and project teams (helps with buy in)
  • Set short term goals
  • Provide seminars to help people during the neutral zone – workshops and get staff out of the library
  • Encourage creative problem solving – bend and create new rules
  • Create a transition monitoring team – don’t run it, just keep tabs. Feedback.
New Beginnings
  • Beginnings reactivate old anxieties
  • New Beginning/ New way seems like a gamble
  • Fear that if it is a failure there will be punishment (who will be blamed?)
  • May have preferred to stay in the neutral zone – more creative = more fun
  • Communication is Key
Scenario: what communication? what are new duties, what are new measures of success and is everyone ‘there’? Positive, personalized help, reassure, tech competencies and training, confidence building, RA, training materials and guides,
How help?
  • Provide encouragement through the 4 P’s:
    • Purpose
    • Picture – illustration
    • Plan – more detail about what’s happening
    • Part to Play – roles and responsibilities
Reinforce the new beginning
  • be consistent and say things consistently
  • ensure quick successes
  • symbolize the new identity
  • celebrate the success

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